Cat Armstrong Soule, PhD

she, her, hers, Associate Professor

About

Cat’s research focuses on judgment and decision making within the exchange and consumption contexts. Broadly, she concentrates her work on how consumers form perceptions and how those perceptions are related to intentions and behaviors in a sustainability context. Her other areas of research expertise include anti-consumption, secondhand exchange, pricing, consumer protections, brand communities, and consumer-to-consumer exchange. She uses a variety of research methodology including experimental, interview, descriptive survey, field research, observational and data scraped from social media.

Cat has taught MBA Marketing Management and many undergraduate courses such as: Principles of Marketing, Brand Management, Consumer Behavior, and Integrated Marketing Communications at Western Washington University, University of Oregon and University of Montana. She also created and often teaches a course entitled People & Money: Behavioral and Psychological Perspectives on Pricing.

She has published research in Psychology & Marketing, the Journal of the Association of Consumer Research, Journal of Advertising, the Journal of Marketing Management, the Journal of Macromarketing, the Journal of Consumer Marketing, the Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics and the British Food Journal. Her work is routinely presented at conferences such as the Association for Consumer Research, Society of Consumer Psychology, ICAR, Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, Pricing and Retailing and Marketing and Public Policy.

Dr. Armstrong Soule's Curriculum Vitae

Selected Publications

Armstrong Soule, Catherine A. and Tejvir Sekhon (2022), “Signaling Nothing: Motivating the Masses with Status Signals that Encourage Anti-Consumption,” Journal of Macromarketing, 42(2), 308-325.

Madrigal, Robert, Marcus Wardley and Catherine Armstrong Soule (2021), “Measuring the Motivation to Avoid Being Duped: Scale Development and Validation,” Journal of Consumer Marketing, 38(7), 791-801. 

Armstrong Soule, Catherine A. and Sara Hanson (2021) “Counting Monopoly Money Twice: Resale Discounting in Consumer-to-Consumer Secondhand Exchanges,” Journal of the Association of Consumer Research, 6(4), 447-461. 

Sekhon, Tejvir and Catherine A. Armstrong Soule (2020), “Conspicuous Anti-Consumption: When Green Demarketing Brands Restore Symbolic Benefits to Anti-Consumers,” Psychology & Marketing, 37(2), 278-290

Todd, Breanna and Catherine A. Armstrong Soule (2019), “Brands, Fans and Exchanges: Differentiating Between Fandoms, Transactional and Social Brand Communities, and Brand Publics,” Handbook of Research on the Impact of Fandom in Society and Consumerism, IGI Global: Hershey, PA and reprinted in Global Branding: Breakthroughs in Research and Practice, IGI Global: Hershey, PA

Armstrong Soule, Catherine A. and Tejvir Singh Sekhon (2018), “Preaching to the Middle of the Road: Strategic Differences in Persuasive Appeals for Meat Anti-Consumption,” British Food Journal, 121(1), 157-171.

Armstrong Soule, Catherine A. and Sara Hanson (2018), “Buying Unicorns: The Impact of Consumer-to-Consumer Branded Buy/Sell/Trade Communities on Traditional Retail Buying Behavior,” Journal of the Association of Consumer Research, 3(3), 260-276.

Todd, Breanna and Catherine A. Armstrong Soule (2017), “Fans and Brands: Delineating Between Fandoms, Brand Communities and Brand Publics,” Exploring the Rise of Fandom in Contemporary Consumer Culture, IGI Global: Hershey, PA.

Reich, Brandon J. and Catherine A. Armstrong Soule (2016), “Green Demarketing in Advertisements: Comparing ‘Buy Green’ and ‘Buy Less’ Appeals in Product and Institutional Advertising Contexts,” Journal of Advertising, 45 (4), 441-458.

Armstrong Soule, Catherine A. and Brandon J. Reich (2015), “Less is More: Is Green Demarketing Sustainable?” Journal of Marketing Management, 31 (13-14), 1403-1427.

Armstrong Soule, Catherine A. and Robert Madrigal (2015), “Anchors and Norms in Anonymous Pay-What-You-Want Pricing Contexts,” Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, 57 (August), 167-175.